Acoustic

Mutagenesis | The Young Man Who Flew Past | Currents | Prophecies | Cloudsplitter | BC

Mutagenesis
Violin, Piano, Cello, Voice
3′

Mutagenesis: A process by which the genetic information of an organism is changed in a stable manner, either in nature
or experimentally by the use of chemicals or radiation.

Performances:

INTERSECTIONS at Tenri Cultural Institute – November 4, 2008; New York, NY


The Young Man Who Flew Past
Vioin, Cello, Piano, Tenor
7’30”

Action, suspense, comedy and high drama coexist in Arcadii Averchenko’s tale of epiphany and death. The schizophrenic
nature of the protagonist is reflected in the hyperdramatic musical setting.

Performances:

INTERSECTIONS at Tenri Cultural Institute – November 4, 2008; New York, NY


Currents
Flute, Oboe, 2 Guitars, Violin, Cello
3′

This piece is a bi-product of my work in CSound, a popular program for the synthesis and processing of sound. When building timbres from scratch, one tends to think more about the layers of a sound. It occurred to me that it might be interesting to apply this synthetic mentality to the construction of acoustic music, that is, rather than take each instrument at face value, I could “build” new instruments using combinations of those present in Cygnus Ensemble. This piece uses individual instruments as layers of more complex sounds that change slowly over time.

Performances:

CYGNUS Ensemble Concert (The Graduate Center) – April 18, 2006; New York, NY


Prophecies
5 Songs for Tenor and Piano
~10′

II: “Two Prophecies”

V. “Century 1, Quatrain 1″

Performances:

ACA‘s American Music Festival at the Flea Theatre – June 11, 2005; New York, NY
Queens College – December, 2003; New York, NY
Tanner Knight Recital – May 2003; Clintonville, NY
Crane School of Music – March, 2003; Potsdam, NY


Cloudsplitter
Flute, Clarinet, Marimba, Piano, Violin, Cello
7′

The title “Cloud Splitter” is an English translation of “Tahawus”, the Native-American name for Mt. Marcy. Marcy is New York’s highest mountain, and is also the highest peak in the Adirondack range. Though this piece is not programmatic, it is inspired by the incredible feeling that one experiences when climbing in the Adirondacks, especially gazing from Marcy’s summit. The piece’s central concern is the interval of a perfect fifth and, by extension, the cycle of fifths. It utilizes different combinations and arrangements of the fifth cycle to gain other intervals. For example, the stacking of two fifths results in the outer interval of a major second. Though not a 12-tone piece, the completion of the chromatic scale plays a significant part in the piece’s structure.

Performances:

Jacob Abela Ensemble – August 28, 2008; Australia
Syracuse Society for New Music – November 12, 2006; Syracuse, NY
SCI Region II Conference – November 11, 2006; Hamilton, NY
Queens College (ICE Ensemble) – December, 2004; New York, NY


BC
3 Movements for Violin and Cello

Second Movement (video):

Performances:

INTERSECTIONS (Tenri Cultural Institute) – November 14, 2008; New York, NY
Queens College – May, 2003; New York, NY
Queens College Composers’ Concert – December, 2002; New York, NY
Crane School of Music – May 2002; Potsdam, NY