Electronic

Memory Fragments | Commuter | Cubicle Revisited | Cubicle | A Walk… | Effluvium | Schach’s Passing

Memory Fragments
solo performer and live electronics (with brain-to-computer interface); any number of channels
variable duration

Grains of sound act as windows to hazy memories, perforations in time that reveal past spaces. As the windows increase in density and size, underlying sonic elements are clarified and combined to create colored soundscapes. This piece utilizes a brain-to-computer interface. Concentrated thoughts on discreet spatial operations (forward, back, up, down, etc.) trigger sonic events and decide the flow of the piece.

Performances:

Crane School of Music 125th Anniversary Celebration: Composition at Crane (invited alumni composer) – March 6, 2012; Potsdam, NY


Commuter
stereo playback
12′

It is my routine to commute five hours a day between Long Island and Harlem. As I listen to the sounds around me, my mind drifts and I find myself on another kind of commute, between the conscious world, and the world of imagination and memory. Commuter explores this hazy consciousness wherein the boundaries of worlds become blurred. The anonymous sounds of travel dissolve as more personal soundscapes emerge. The recordings for this piece were made in the winter of 2010 between Suffolk County and Harlem.

Performances:

NYCEMF – March 27, 2010; New York, NY
SEAMUS – January 20, 2011; Miami, FL


Cubicle Revisited (with Anthony Angelicola, video)
stereo playback + video
9′

Cubicle, in its original audio version, is the second in a series of pieces that deals with the transformation of real-world soundscapes (classroom, forest, subway, office) into musical environments. In this work, the listener is inserted into an office. Certain sounds begin to take on unrealistic characteristics before the entire scene is transformed into a more abstract musical space.
In Cubicle Revisited, Anthony Angelicola incorporates his own visual realization of the sonic landscape.

Performances:

Brandeis/CUNY Composers’ Concert – November 13, 2008; New York, NY
Queens College Electronic Music Concert – December 4, 2008; New York, NY
CUNY Composers’ Alliance Concert – December 9, 2008
Raritan Valley International Juried Video Exhibition – February 13, 2009; Branchburg, NJ
Galapagos Art Space (NYCEMF) – April 2, 2009; New York, NY
European Media Art Festival – April 23, 2009; Onasbruck, Germany
VideoX Experimental Film and Video Festival – May 23, 2009; Zurich, Switzerland

AWARD: Directors Choice, Black Mariah Film Festival; Jersey City, NJ


Cubicle
stereo playback
9′

“Cubicle” is the second in a series of pieces that deal with the transformation of real-world soundscapes into abstract musical environments. In this work, the listener is inserted into a vividly portrayed office environment. Certain sounds begin to take on unrealistic characteristics before the entire scene is transformed into a more abstract musical place. All sounds are derived from office sounds or playground sounds.

Performances:

Queens College Electronic Music Concert – May 16, 2007; New York, NY
SCI Region II Conference – November 17, 2007; New York, NY
Foldover, WOBC Radio Broadcast – December 10, 2007; Oberlin, NY
SEAMUS – April 3, 2008; Salt Lake City, UT
FEMF 17 – April 11, 2008; Gainesville, FL


A Walk Through the Snow
stereo playback
7’20”

In this piece I’ve been experimenting with the simulation of a real-world environment out of many separate sources. My idea was to invite the listener into a somewhat familiar situation via this simulated world, and then to manipulate the individual sounds slowly so that the perception would be of a world slowly melting into something else…

All sounds are derived from recordings of birds, footsteps, and a stream.

Performances:

Composers’ Alliance Concert – May 4, 2006; New York, NY
Queens College Electronic Music Concert – May 10, 2006; New York, NY
CUNY: Convergence – May 12, 2006; New York, NY
FEMF 16 – April 14, 2007; Gainesville, FL


Effluvium
stereo playback
12′

Effluvium, as referenced by the title, refers to the point at which the listener begins to perceive a fundamental instead of the individual partials, or vice versa. The principal concept behind this piece is to explore this point, and to elaborate the relationship between overtones and fundamental. Density of partials, relative spacing of partials, diffusion of partials, and envelope of partials are all important points of investigation. In the first section, individual partials are brought in slowly, but fade away just as a hint of the fundamental can be heard. As the section progresses, the fundamentals eventually emerge and the texture gives way to a passage of low notes, whose partials undulate from within. A section of bell-like tones follows, in which the listener can readily perceive certain melodic properties of the overtone series. Increasing density of texture sparks a climactic section characterized by the rapid jiggling of each partial at different rates (I call this “overtone jello”) and the eventual breaking apart of the fundamental into its constituent thirty-two partials.

Performances:

Queens College Electronic Music Concert – December 5, 2005; New York, NY
Composers Alliance Concert – December 5, 2005; New York, NY
FEMF 15 – April 8, 2006; Gainesville, FL


Schach’s Passing
stereo playback
1’20”

Performances:

Queens College Composers’ Concert – May, 2005; New York, NY